Man Up

5 Responses to Man Up

  1. Daniel Lovejoy says:

    I was wondering if you belong to a union or if you are freelance.
    I’m anti-union myself (and considering I’m more liberal than conservative, that’s different), would never belong to one and I have crossed picket lines. On the other hand though, corporations are not very good at policing themselves, and unions have kept some of the worst abuses in check.

    • Bok says:

      I was a member of the Newspaper Guild. It wasn’t as severe as ObamaCare’s individual mandate, but I it was a closed shop. You didn’t have to join the union but you did have to pay dues as a condition of employment with the newspaper. It would be stupid to pay the dues and not at least know where they were going. And that wasn’t pretty – they supported the agenda of the Communication Workers of America and political candidates I opposed. I can understand the compulsory requirement – people would enjoy whatever benefits the union brought without paying the price – free riders in unionspeak.

  2. Jabberwocky says:

    What I don’t understand (as a public service worker) is why we should have to give up our right to collective bargaining because we work for the State.

    The majority of public service workers AREN’T in high-paying positions. Sure, the benefits may be a bit better, but we’re told when we hire in that the better benefits are supposed to offset our lower-than-average wages. As the cost of benefits continues to increase, we ARE having to contribute more of our wages for benefits.

    I’m certainly not in my position for the money. I love and believe in what I do and I know the majority of people I work with are the same way.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I believe FDR said it best, and he was the most progressive president we’ve had, until now.

    “All Government employees should realize that the process of collective bargaining, as usually understood, cannot be transplanted into the public service. It has its distinct and insurmountable limitations when applied to public personnel management. The very nature and purposes of Government make it impossible for administrative officials to represent fully or to bind the employer in mutual discussions with Government employee organizations. The employer is the whole people, who speak by means of laws enacted by their representatives in Congress.”

    If you think his position isn’t clear from that quote, consider this one:

    “Since their own services have to do with the functioning of the Government, a strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to prevent or obstruct the operations of Government until their demands are satisfied. Such action, looking toward the paralysis of Government by those who have sworn to support it, is unthinkable and intolerable.”

  4. Brad Hanson says:

    I believe FDR said it best, and he was the most progressive president we’ve had, until now.

    “All Government employees should realize that the process of collective bargaining, as usually understood, cannot be transplanted into the public service. It has its distinct and insurmountable limitations when applied to public personnel management. The very nature and purposes of Government make it impossible for administrative officials to represent fully or to bind the employer in mutual discussions with Government employee organizations. The employer is the whole people, who speak by means of laws enacted by their representatives in Congress.”

    If you think his position isn’t clear from that quote, consider this one:

    “Since their own services have to do with the functioning of the Government, a strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to prevent or obstruct the operations of Government until their demands are satisfied. Such action, looking toward the paralysis of Government by those who have sworn to support it, is unthinkable and intolerable.”

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