Tag Archives: romney

Romney’s Common Touch

If the polls are right, Romney isn’t connecting with us common folk in Ohio. Michael Kinsley says he is the new Dukakis. Rush says the polls are wrong because they oversample Democrats.

Romney’s 47 Percent

Romney says 47% of voters depend on government and should be written off to Obama.

In 2008 Obama said that blue collar voters “cling to their guns and religion”.

Slate’s William Saletan says it’s not the same because in the end “Obama tells his audience not to write off any group”.

Thomas B. Edsall of the NYT missed that memo when he wrote last November that the Obama campaign would abandon the white working class vote:

“For decades, Democrats have suffered continuous and increasingly severe losses among white voters. But preparations by Democratic operatives for the 2012 election make it clear for the first time that the party will explicitly abandon the white working class.”

As for Romney, it’s true that almost half the population doesn’t pay federal income tax. But his 47% isn’t a permanent class of government serfs. It includes retired people and people just starting out, or starting over, who may hope one day to join the evil 1% who pay 38% of all federal income taxes.

Mitt should take Obama’s earlier advice.

Pre-existing Condition

Romney says he wants to cover pre-existing conditions but he’s having trouble explaining how his plan is the same, but different, from Obama’s.

Open Book

During his surprise press conference Monday, the president defended his campaign tactics by again calling for Romney to release his tax returns.  He said, “if you want to be president… your life’s an open book when it comes to things like your finances”.

He also accused Romney of “just making stuff up” in an ad that accuses Obama is gutting welfare reform.

 

Harry Reid


Funny political cartoon by Chip Bok. Harry Reid accuses Romney of not paying his taxes for ten years

Harry Reid repeated unsubstantiated charges, on the Senate floor, that Romney didn’t pay taxes for 10 years. Nearly the same amount of time the Senate hasn’t passed a budget.